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Haslett Middle School Vandalism Essay

Illustration by Philip Burke.

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Like so many of us, I’ve spent the last 18 months enthralled by the dark carnival of our latest national election. From the start, I couldn’t tear my eyes from the spectacle of the Republican primaries. Never have I experienced such oceanic quantities of schadenfreude as I did watching the front men for modern conservatism stand slack-jawed while the leading candidate for their party’s nomination figuratively slapped George W. Bush across the face for starting the Iraq War and flushed 30 years of free-market trade policy down the toilet like schoolwork torn from the hands of teachers’ pets. From my own white, middle-class safety, I thrilled at Donald Trump finally bringing the Republican Party’s appeals to racial prejudice into the open, where they would be judged in all their ugliness. But at the end of each debate, I felt the nausea of the glutton and promised myself to consume less of the circus in the days ahead, only to return to the political blogs the next morning, hungry for fatuous commentary on who had “won,” knowing in my gut that all I or any of us were doing was losing whatever frayed threads of decency still held American political life together. Through the conventions, the summer meltdowns, and now the fall debates, my mind has been captive to each flicker in the polls.

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And I am hardly alone. Our presidential contests have become such prolonged episodes of mass distraction and political anxiety it’s hard to even keep track of what we are experiencing. Still, we have to try. And that begins by understanding that one of the reasons they have become such totalizing events is that presidential elections are one of the only chances we have left to fulfill the basic human need to experience collective emotion. In an era of social atomization and online living, when we have so few points of civic attachment in the vast middle ground between domestic life and the imperial presidency, the candidates—as the phenomenon of Barack Obama made abundantly clear—have become repositories for feelings that have nowhere else to go. What have been, for most of our history, political contests over leadership of the executive branch have transmogrified in recent decades into something we experience less as debates on the direction of the nation than as zero-sum battles over who will be allowed the pleasure and relief of feeling they are not alone in their own country. Beneath the smog of vitriol and disgust that has characterized this election, then, lies a great sorrow: that there is so little fellow feeling left among us these days that we are compelled to seek it in our national leader. Historically, this has never been a good sign.

No one has better manipulated this paucity of solidarity—and thus more powerfully distracted us from the concerns of real life—than Donald Trump. He’s accomplished this through endless acts of public verbal violence that have broken one unwritten rule of political discourse after the next, and have had the effect that all violence does: to shock those who experience it into a kind of stunned passivity. Eventually, as we have seen, the violence numbs people’s senses to the point that they no longer fully register the horror of what they are living through.

Trump's special vileness is always to increase the measure of rhetorical violence others are prepared to inflict.

In an essay on King Lear, the philosopher Stanley Cavell describes Lear’s daughter Regan, who orders the eyes of her father’s loyal friend Gloucester gouged out, thusly: “She has no ideas of her own; her special vileness is always to increase the measure of pain others are prepared to inflict; her mind is itself a lynch mob.” A year and a half into Trump’s incitement of a campaign, this seems the most concise formulation of his character: He has no ideas of his own; his special vileness is always to increase the measure of rhetorical violence others are prepared to inflict; his mind is itself a political mob.

How can we resist this maelstrom of distraction and the intellectual passivity it induces? We have to start by letting go of the two beliefs, nearly universally accepted, that lie at the heart of it. The first is that Trump, in his serial demolition of political norms, is some radical anomaly, unprecedented in our stable two-party system—an argument that Hillary Clinton’s campaign has, disappointingly, chosen to center itself on. While this is true in a host of trivial ways, the repetition of it ad nauseam hides the far deeper continuity between Trump and the development within the American right over the last two decades of precisely the strategy of political vandalism and brinkmanship that he has used to fuel his rise.

The second belief to let go of, and the more powerfully distorting one in the long run, is that the emotion driving our present politics is anger, when it would be more accurate and far more illuminating to say that it’s shame—economic, ethnic, and personal shame. And here, importantly, there is no obvious partisan divide. At a time of gaping inequality and an ever-more-freelance labor market, economic insecurity—absolute or relative—is a general condition for the vast majority of the population, regardless of what the official unemployment numbers tell us. For all the political rage on display in this election, the deeper, more private, and more pervasive feeling animating our current political misery is the shame that has always accompanied poverty, or not being able to provide all you want for your children, or enjoying less than you see others enjoying, or—in this second Gilded Age—simply not being rich. Add to this the humiliation that our society visits with such numbing regularity on women, racial and sexual minorities, and, increasingly, on white working-class people for their supposed pathologies, and you begin to see that shame has become the force that binds us together.

“You people don’t win, that’s for sure.” —Donald Trump, to voters in Pennsylvania

The real divide comes in how this shame is used. Trump has weaponized it. Indeed, his skill is precisely this: to create an entire national theater of shame in which he induces that very emotion in his followers, on the one hand, while on the other saving them from having to acknowledge its pain by publicly shaming others instead. This has been the central action of his campaign from the outset. He tells people that “we don’t win anymore,” that we are losers, losers who “don’t even have a country,” because it has been overrun and “raped” by immigrants and foreign powers. This summer, in Erie, Pennsylvania, he dropped the pretense of including himself among the losers and told his audience directly: “You people don’t win, that’s for sure.” But yelling at people about their degraded state is just part of a larger performance in which he gives them the means to avoid the shame of their condition by enjoying, live or online, his shaming of others: opponents, journalists, protesters, disabled people, and, often most virulently, women. His recent misogynist tirade against a former Miss Universe is just one in a series of instances in which he has figuratively offered up the bodies of women for public denunciation. Despite all the attention to the rage supposedly being channeled by Trump’s campaign, it isn’t anger that has made this theater of his hypnotic. It’s the more primal pain and pleasure of public humiliation.

In contrast, the Democratic Party that Clinton now leads is grounded in the opposite, ethical response to shame—at least for the historically disenfranchised identity groups at the heart of the Obama coalition—which is to acknowledge the existence of shame and the suffering it has caused, and then to seek its political repair. This is the social balm that the party proposes to cover the bruising of its neoliberal economic policy: We’ll give you gays in the military, you give us the Trans-Pacific Partnership. That one of the unintended consequences of this gambit has been to open up space for Trump and others to exacerbate the shame experienced by a large segment of the white working class is the most volatile and misunderstood dynamic of this election.

* * *

To get at the roots of the right’s political vandalism and the supercharged emotions of this election, we need to return to the modern avatar of antiestablishment resentment, Rupert Murdoch. Contrary to his image on the left as the Darth Vader of conservatism, Murdoch, like Trump, has long been a chameleon when it comes to political party. In the United Kingdom, his papers supported Labour before they supported Margaret Thatcher; they played a decisive role in electing Tony Blair prime minister, before switching again to the Conservatives under David Cameron. As biographies of Murdoch make clear, from his earliest days as an Australian at Oxford with socialist leanings, to his economically foolish determination to buy TheWall Street Journal late in life, his central urge has been far less to bring victory to any particular ideology than to thwart, discomfit, and if possible destroy whatever he perceives to be the establishment, be it English aristocrats, cultural snobs, labor unions, or East Coast liberal elites.

In a description of Murdoch’s entry into the British media business in the 1960s, The Economist once credited him with having “invented the modern tabloid newspaper—a stew of sexual titillation, moral outrage and political aggression.” Long before his most famous media property appeared on American cable, Murdoch imported this stew to the United States with his purchase of the New York Post in the mid-’70s. One of the first things he did was to order up a gossip column, the famous “Page Six.” The “heart—and spleen—of the paper,” as Vanity Faironce described it, the column was meant to bring the high and mighty down to the realm its readers occupied by exposing their hidden seediness.

“Page Six” and the New York Post are what first made Trump famous. As a former “Page Six” editor aptly put it, the column “definitely played a role in helping push Donald Trump to the first round of his never-ending whatever.” An otherwise unremarkable heir of a real-estate fortune, Trump became the subject of a record number of Post covers for his carefully cultivated and basically false image as a Manhattan playboy. His salacious behavior and conspicuous lifestyle sold newspapers, just as they sell cable and Web ads today.

In creating Fox News, Murdoch brought the tabloid stew of sex, outrage, and aggression to coverage of Washington.

In creating Fox News, Murdoch brought the format of the tabloid newspaper to coverage of Washington. And it has been this format—the “stew of sexual titillation, moral outrage and political aggression”—more than the channel’s support for any particular candidate or policy, that has had the most lasting and corrosive effect on our politics. As the intrepid Gabriel Sherman details in his biography of Roger Ailes, erstwhile Fox News chief and current Trump adviser, the network’s audience began to explode based on its coverage (and, in no small part, its invention) of the Monica Lewinsky scandal. With the help of Matt Drudge, the Murdoch Mini-Me of the early Internet, a new, hyper-aggressive gossip-mongering became, for the first time, a major driver of Americans’ understanding of their government, with other networks and websites entering similar territory in order to compete. It was during Ken Starr’s investigation that the marriage between right-wing Republicans and tabloid media that defines our political landscape today was consummated.

What elected politicians like House Speaker Newt Gingrich and his henchmen brought to the wedding table to feed this new spectacle machine was a willingness to commit what amounted to vandalism of the Constitution in the pursuit of an ideological end. Before we allow Trump’s violence to create such amnesia that people pine for the sober-minded Republicans of the 1990s, let us not forget that the impeachment of Bill Clinton was a grotesque abuse of the system of checks and balances, out of joint with any reasonable understanding of when that extraordinary power ought to be exercised. Just as Trump’s antics do now, the impeachment circus engrossed the nation, stunning much of it into a new political normal in which a flimsy and hypocritical moral crisis justified such vandalism. Its real purpose, of course, was to debilitate a Democratic president and engender deep cynicism about the federal government—the ideological end of an antigovernment party.

The impeachment was such a success even in its failure, much as Trump has thus far proven to be, that it set the template for how the right could operate from a position of political and, increasingly, cultural weakness to nonetheless achieve its revanchist aims: by violating a political norm in spectacular fashion, thereby creating a media frenzy and, under cover of the ensuing distraction, advancing its otherwise endangered or unachievable goals. Just as physical violence monopolizes attention in real time, so theatrical and rhetorical violence monopolizes it in the political space.

Thus, during the Florida recount, the Bush campaign, in a plot conceived in part by Trump adviser Roger Stone, paid hundreds of Republican operatives to fake a violent protest outside a Miami-Dade election center. The so-called “Brooks Brothers riot” interrupted and discredited the electoral process itself; the resulting wall-to-wall cable-news coverage stupefied the country into believing that chaos reigned, and that the Supreme Court—despite violating its own legal norms—was justified in deciding the election. It remains, at least for a few more weeks, the most consequential victory of tabloid journalism over our political institutions, altering as it did the course of history and leading to the war in Iraq.

Employing the formula in 2004, right-wing groups, again with the help of Fox News, created a months-long news circus by trashing another supposedly sacrosanct rule of our political life: that a decorated war hero—in this case, John Kerry­—would not be attacked for his service. Again, the story drew such fervid attention not, in the main, because of its content, which was paltry, but because, consciously or not, we were stunned by the violation of what had been an implicit bargain about the treatment of veterans. It was this violence that did the enthralling; and with the successful “swift-boating” of Kerry, a weak president was reelected. If Trump’s rhetorical cluster bombs make these episodes seem quaint, it is not because they are different in kind, but in degree: The arc and format of their unfolding in the media are nearly identical.

By the time we reach the Obama administration and the right’s massive resistance to its very existence, the vandalism of unwritten institutional arrangements and the ginning-up of false crises—each with its own attendant cable-news conflagration—proliferate so quickly they’re hard to catalog: the Tea Party’s emergence; Joe “You lie!” Wilson; Mitch McConnell announcing that the Senate’s chief priority was to make Obama a one-term president; the threat to default on the national debt; the government shutdown; and, most recently, the refusal to hold hearings for a sitting president’s Supreme Court nominee.

What we see over the past 20 years is a domestic variation of what Naomi Klein described in The Shock Doctrine.

Once we step back from all the drama and fake emergencies, what we see over the past 20 years, beginning with the Clinton impeachment, is a domestic variation of what Naomi Klein described in The Shock Doctrine. But here, rather than inducing and taking advantage of disasters, wars, and other types of violence to advance laissez-faire capitalism, the right is fomenting and subsequently manipulating a misery that exists mainly in the realm of culture and fantasy. While free-market economics has come along for the ride, the main antigovernment end being advanced in this less concrete realm has far older and deeper roots in American history than Milton Friedman. It is an attack on the federal government and judiciary for its perceived sponsorship of the interests, and often simply the full citizenship, of African Americans, women, and other racial and sexual minorities—a sponsorship that, ever since Lyndon Johnson signed the Civil Rights Act into law, has become more and more identified with the Democratic Party.

It is no accident that this pattern of vandalism began in the 1990s, just as Republican dominance of the popular vote was ending (even if Trump were to eke out a victory over Clinton, in no scenario would he receive an absolute majority). People don’t employ vandalism from a position of strength; they resort to it when their weakness in the existing system prevents them from achieving their goals through regular order. To the extent, then, that we continue to treat Trump’s own shock doctrine as anomalous rather than as the latest fruit of the now long-standing marriage between tabloid journalism and the American right, we remain caught in one of the most powerful distractions contained in most coverage of this election: the idea that any of this is going to end on November 8.

Whether Trump wins or loses, the purposeful degrading of our political culture will intensify.

Whether Trump wins or loses, starts a cable network, or runs again for president, the purposeful degrading and delegitimizing of our political culture and institutions that he has accelerated will not only continue; as the electoral strength of the GOP further wanes, it will intensify. That’s what Trump is—an intensification of an existing weakness. If Democrats, much less progressives, retain any aspiration to advance their goals through the existing system, we have to be clear-eyed about what is occurring—or we are as doomed to fail as a boxer at a knife fight.

* * *

How did it come to this? The most common explanation given is that decades of technological advancement and automation, neoliberal trade and labor policy, and stagnating real wages have effectively disenfranchised huge numbers of Americans by cutting off access to a decent, stable life for themselves and their children. Vast inequality in wealth, combined with demographic change and residential segregation along racial and ideological lines, has fostered mutual suspicion and resentment among those who see their place in the old social hierarchy eroding. And thus we arrive at the dominant trope of the endless attempts to account for Trump’s rise: the seething, racially tinged anger of the white working class. For 18 months, barely a day has gone by that I haven’t read an article that told some version of this story.

This story is not untrue. The economic and cultural conditions it describes are real. But as an explanation of Trump, it obscures as much as it reveals, because it buys into the image that Trump himself is peddling: that he is the true populist channeling the fury of dispossessed white America. And in this effort, for all their supposed antagonism, Trump and the news media have cooperated in portraying his theatrical rage and the most violent behavior of a minority of his supporters as the emotional crux of his campaign. This is how we’ve been led to equate the character of his live audiences with that of his electoral support. But if we allow ourselves to believe that some 40 percent of the national electorate consists of foaming-at-the-mouth white supremacists, we may as well copy the Texans, start our own secessionist movement, and call it a day. Yes, Trump is inciting racial hatred and mainstreaming white-supremacist politics more directly than any of his Republican predecessors dared to do. But for all the attention this does and must receive, it is not all that he is doing.

The widely cited Hillbilly Elegy: A Memoir of a Family and Culture in Crisis, by National Review contributor J.D. Vance, recently offered what is, in essence, a gentler version of the infamous Moynihan Report—only this time written from the inside and about the social mores not of African Americans, but of the residents of what Vance calls “Greater Appalachia.” Its most telling passage doesn’t deny the existence of racial resentment in the world he grew up in; rather, it complicates it:

We know we’re not doing well. We see it every day: in the obituaries for teenage kids that conspicuously omit the cause of death (reading between the lines: overdose), in the deadbeats we watch our daughters waste their time with. Barack Obama strikes at the heart of our deepest insecurities. He is a good father while many of us aren’t. He wears suits to his job while we wear overalls, if we’re lucky enough to have a job at all. His wife tells us that we shouldn’t be feeding our children certain foods, and we hate her for it—not because we think she’s wrong but because we know she’s right.

What Vance is describing here is shame. A shame that is both personal and ethnic, that is grounded in economic conditions but experienced socially—both locally, within communities, and nationally, in the fun-house mirror of the mass media.

It is certainly true that the recently noticed travails of white people without college educations, such as increased heroin use and higher suicide rates, have received strikingly more sympathetic coverage than the ongoing suffering of African Americans living in poverty. Nonetheless, to understand Trump’s flourishing, we have to acknowledge that the degrading of the social fabric wrought by our brand of capitalism, and by the Great Recession in particular, isn’t limited to communities of color. In the places Vance writes about—towns that have become the subjects of the kind of voyeuristic “profiles in despair” that The New York Times and The Washington Post once reserved for developing countries—what Trump has taken a sadistic advantage of is not so much raw anger, but rather its more basic predicate: the shame of being lesser-than. It’s the feeling Vance describes arriving at that bastion of establishment privilege, Yale Law School, where his lower social class planted “a doubt in my mind about whether I belonged” and “the lies I told about my own past” weighed on him. In much the same way that a gay kid can only overcome the damage of self-loathing by acknowledging it, part of what allowed Vance to form intimate relationships after being raised by a drug-addicted mother in a series of poor white communities in Ohio is that he “stopped being ashamed. My parents’ mistakes were not my fault, so I had no reason to hide them.”

There is something very important to listen to here if, in the long run, we’re to have any hope of repairing the vandalism that the right wing has visited on the body politic, and that Trump is committing with such abandon. Shame is what we have in common. It is the messy, volatile, and most often intolerable feeling that haunts unemployed young men in isolated rural communities and urban ghettos alike. It gnaws at millions of women who are belittled, harassed, and underpaid, and who live on their own in higher numbers than ever in our history while still being told that family is the key to fulfillment. It plagues African Americans humiliated by the police, or who have had loved ones killed by them, only to be told that the victims were to blame for their own deaths. Despite the advances in gay rights, it still consumes LGBTQ youth, who kill themselves at four times the rate of their straight brothers and sisters. It eats away at veterans consigned to poverty. And yes, it troubles the spirits of many white Americans living in what are glibly called the “fly-over states,” who perceive—not incorrectly—that most of the gild of the age is concentrated in cities on the coasts, whose wealthier residents consider them cultural primitives.

Indeed, it even lies in the hearts of those who, on the left, we consider our most virulent enemies. As Gabriel Sherman’s book chronicles, the leading men of Fox News—Roger Ailes and Bill O’Reilly—were formed in part by feelings of class humiliation that bred their resentment of what they consider the liberal establishment. As for Trump, he’s a son of the outer boroughs whom “Page Six” once reported had been “blackballed” from membership at the most exclusive country club in East Hampton because, after all, he simply wasn’t one of them.

* * *

Make shame into a weapon, and you get the closest thing to fascism we’ve had in this country since the 1930s.

This is the divide. This is the choice. Make shame—your own and others’—into a weapon, as these men have done, and you get the closest thing to fascism we’ve had in this country since the 1930s. Create the room for shame’s articulation, and therefore a recognition of our commonality, and you have at least a shot at the working basis for an ameliorative democracy.

But what makes the latter so hard to achieve at present isn’t just the acid partisanship most frequently blamed for our ills; it’s the feedback loop between the endlessly disruptive drive of commodity capitalism and the cultural climate we’ve allowed it to produce. Here the instrumental use of other people’s shame is in no way limited to the political right. Much reality television, The Apprentice most definitely included, is based on it. It wasn’t always the case that ordinary people’s humiliation was the stuff of our daily entertainment. But it is now. What’s more, the tabloid format that Murdoch honed in the UK in the 1960s, that stew of sex, outrage, and aggression, hasn’t just corroded our experience of national politics. It has, in a very real sense, swallowed us whole. Between pornography, celebrity gossip, crime and disaster clickbait, and political fury, the Internet itself has become the infinitely circulating tabloid we live our days inside. We don’t even require the Murdochs of the world anymore. On social media, we turn our own lives into tabloids: gossiping, titillating, publishing our moral outrage and our political diatribes, updated by the minute. And nowhere has shame been more effectively weaponized than on these platforms, where online bullying immiserates lonely teenagers and people share links to revenge-porn videos to humiliate their departed lovers. It is not just Trump supporters who are caught up in a national theater of shame. In one way or another, to one degree or another, we are all in attendance now.

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Is it any wonder, then, that fellow feeling is so hard to come by? And that we would seek it, in however mediated a form, from some of the only people left who can act as containers of our collective emotion—our presidential candidates. Hillary Clinton’s inability, for a variety of reasons, to become that vector of shared sentiment, as Obama so clearly did, is one of the defining facts of this election—as is Trump’s ability to achieve precisely that. The fact that he is the one to accomplish this in 2016 brings to mind a line of Mary Gaitskill’s, from her novel Veronica: “The more withered the reality, the more gigantic and tyrannical the dream.”

Donald Trump, a would-be tyrant, is a creature born of our already withered public life. He is neither an anomaly nor the end of his kind. We either find a way to acknowledge together what we suffer in common, or we live in his world.

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  • OP-ED CONTRIBUTOR; The Allure of Terrorism
  • Opposition Figure Elected in Croatia
  • Optimism Takes Charge at an Electronics Show
  • OUR TOWNS; In Sour Economy, Biggest Gambler at Foxwoods Is the Casino Itself
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  • PARIS JOURNAL; Revelers See a Dimming In a Capital's Night Life
  • Police Say Boy, 15, Stabbed Boy, 12
  • Popular Demand
  • Power Failure Leads to Flight Cancellations in Cleveland
  • Q & A with Stuart Elliott
  • Race Riots Grip an Italian Town, and a Mafia Role Is Investigated
  • RAVENS 33, PATRIOTS 14; Dominating Victory by the Ravens Shakes Up a Dynasty
  • RECIPES FOR HEALTH; Burgers Without the Beef
  • REUTERS BREAKINGVIEWS; Hope of Reprieve for Bond Investors
  • RINGS; Shaking Injury, Vonn Wins Third In Three Days
  • SEAT BELTS ARE VERY OPTIONAL
  • Sheik Acquitted In Torture Case
  • SOCCER; Donovan, on Loan From U.S., Makes Debut at Everton
  • SPORTS BRIEFING | BOXING; Pacquiao Sets Date For Next Fight
  • SPORTS BRIEFING | COLLEGE FOOTBALL; Tuberville Introduced at Texas Tech
  • SPORTS BRIEFING | RALLY RACING; Closer To Victory In Dakar Rally
  • SPORTS BRIEFING | TENNIS; Roddick Holds On In Australia
  • SPORTS OF THE TIMES; As a Statement, This Beating Could Linger in New England
  • Strong Finish by Ogilvy In Start to the PGA Season
  • Study Finds That Papers Lead In Providing New Information
  • Taking Aim at the Big Names in Animated Film
  • Teaching Green, Beyond Recycling
  • TENNIS; Roddick Beats Stepanek to Win Brisbane Warm-Up for Australian Open
  • THEATER REVIEW | 'ONCE AND FOR ALL WE'RE GONNA TELL YOU WHO WE ARE SO SHUT UP AND LISTEN'; In a Playpen of Adolescence, Angst Not Included
  • Today's Best Bets
  • Train Line Across the Balkans Restitches a Wounded Region
  • Treasury Auctions Set for This Week
  • Two Killed in Belt Parkway Crash
  • Under Low-Key Chief, Canal Plus Prospers
  • Using a Pfizer Grant, Courses Aim to Avoid Bias
  • Visualizing Parade, Hoping for Real Thing
  • Washington's Gun Past Affects Arenas's Future
  • WOMEN'S ROUNDUP; No. 2 Stanford Holds Off Rally to Win at U.C.L.A.
  • Yemen's President Says Government Is Willing to Talk to Disarmed Qaeda Fighters
  • 18 AND UNDER; To Treat Bed-Wetting, Healthy Doses of Patience
  • 5 Convicted In Britain Over Protest At Parade
  • A Designer 'Returns' to Sweden for Inspiration
  • A Fight for the Homeless and Against Authority
  • A Future That Doesn't Guzzle
  • A Low Profile This Year, But Chrysler Says Its Day Is Coming
  • A Push to Bring the S.S. United States Home
  • ADVERTISING; A Lofty Perch, Sure, But Reasons To Retool
  • Amid Scandals, Northern Ireland Leader Takes a Leave
  • AND DOWN IN THE STRETCH THEY GO
  • ART; A New Boss, and a Jolt Of Real-World Expertise
  • ARTS, BRIEFLY; 'Glee' Sends Out Call For Reinforcements
  • ARTS, BRIEFLY; A Big Woo-Hoo For 'Simpsons'
  • ARTS, BRIEFLY; Ads To Protest Smoking In 'Avatar'
  • ARTS, BRIEFLY; Chicago Flutist Denies Unkind Sentiments
  • ARTS, BRIEFLY; Judges Announced For Sundance Festival
  • ARTS, BRIEFLY; Onstage Boxing Packs a Wallop
  • Ashton Cautious at Confirmation Hearing
  • Astor's Son To Stay Free During Appeal
  • At a Mighty 104, Gone While Still Going Strong
  • Bank Is in Talks to Settle State Claims Over Merrill
  • BIG CITY; Jobless, Homeless, and Now Known With a Sad Distinction
  • BOOKS OF THE TIMES; The Flowerings of Love Are Not for the Weak
  • Cardinals Won It Later After Trying Too Soon
  • THE CAUCUS; Palin Joins Fox News Team
  • Chimps And Monkeys Could Talk. Why Don't They?
  • China Rises Above Recession, Inviting Scrutiny
  • Citigroup Replaces Head Of Consumer Banking
  • Clinton, Starting Trip, Acknowledges Possible Tensions With China
  • Closer Look At Accident Of Ex-Official
  • Coal Is Linked to Cancer in China Province
  • COLLEGE BASKETBALL ROUNDUP; After Being Down 17, Villanova Roars Back
  • Consuela Lee, Jazz Pianist and Educator, Dies at 83
  • Counting of Calories Isn't Always Accurate
  • The Cowboys Are Confident, but Wary
  • Cowell Says He Will Leave 'Idol'
  • DANCE REVIEW | MIAMI CITY BALLET; In Florida, Fresh Talent Takes to the Stage, Along With a Veteran Team
  • DANCE REVIEW; Rhythms Bursting With Suspense
  • David Gerber, Award-Winning Television Producer, Dies at 86
  • DEALBOOK COLUMN; What the Financial Crisis Commission Should Ask
  • Deaths in Fires Last Year Were the Fewest on Record, Bloomberg Says
  • Digital Care: Denmark Leads Way
  • EDITORIAL; A Real Election, Please
  • EDITORIAL; It Isn't Working for Anyone Else
  • EDITORIAL; Judicial Security
  • EDITORIAL; No More 'Candy Store'
  • Electronic Arts Trims Forecast For 2010 on Weak Europe Sales
  • ENTRY LEVEL; Changing Mind-Sets About School, and Hygiene
  • Eric Rohmer, a Leading Filmmaker Of the French New Wave, Dies at 89
  • Europe, in Grip of Low Temperatures, Faces Flaring Tempers and Disrupted Travel
  • Extremist Officials Blamed In '94 Rwanda Assassination
  • FINDINGS; The Madness of Crowds and an Internet Delusion
  • Fox Woos Conan O'Brien Despite NBC's Contract
  • FREQUENT FLIER; Journeys in Cross-Cultural Drinking, Crimped by Jet Lag
  • Frigid Temperatures in South Are Putting Pipes and Patience to the Test
  • Garment Company Removes Ad Showing Obama in Coat
  • GLOBAL UPDATE; Anthrax: In Scotland, Six Heroin Users Die of Anthrax Poisoning
  • GOAL; Thoughts Turn to Safety in South Africa After Togo Attack
  • Google Apologizes to Chinese Authors
  • Hackett: A 'Heritage' That's Oh-So-British
  • Heineken in Deal to Buy A Big Mexican Brewer
  • High Energy Costs and Dollar's Decline Undermine Alcoa's Profit
  • Hunting Fossil Viruses in Human DNA
  • In New York City, a Chilly Library Has Its Rewards for Union Workers
  • In Packers' Loss, Rule Says No Call Was the Right Call
  • INSIDE EUROPE; The E.U's Big Challenge: To Bring Greece Into Line
  • ITINERARIES; A Cookie Calling Card
  • Joint Effort In Europe Seeks Assets In Distress
  • Koreans Stand Face to Face to Address a Cultural Gap
  • LAMU JOURNAL; Kenya's Port of the Future Finds a Pristine Home
  • Lawyers Challenge Ohio on Executions
  • LEADING OFF; Pity the Packers
  • LETTER; Terror in Sudan
  • LETTERS TO THE INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE; How to Beat Terrorists
  • LETTERS; A Favorite Hollywood Theme: The White Savior
  • LETTERS; Another Look at F.D.R.
  • LETTERS; Looking at Ways to Treat Depression
  • LETTERS; Tetrahedrons In a River
  • LETTERS; Understanding Patients
  • Look Out, Pixar, Here Comes 'Fantastic Mr. Fox'
  • Los Angeles Museum Taps Dealer as Director
  • Losses at Landesbank May Bring Changes to Banking in Germany
  • McDonald's Names U.S. Chief as Its No. 2 Executive
  • McGwire Admits Steroid Use In 1990s, His Years of Magic
  • Miep Gies, 100, the Last of Those Who Hid Anne Frank and Her Family
  • MIND; Before You Quit Antidepressants ...
  • MOVIE REVIEW | 'MY NEIGHBOR MY KILLER'; Side by Side, With the Guilty, After Courts Send Them Home
  • MUSIC REVIEW | GLOBALFEST; A World of Fusions: Hot, Cool and Otherwise
  • MUSIC REVIEW; A Tribute to Her Father, Heavy on Latin Percussion
  • MUSIC REVIEW; Part 1: A Dose of Knotty Modernism. Part 2: Quaint Nostalgia.
  • N.B.A. ROUNDUP; Hawks Continue to Be One Team Celtics Can't Figure
  • N.F.L. FAST FORWARD; Stunning Defeats Raise Serious Doubts
  • N.F.L. ROUNDUP; Browns Hire G.M.
  • N.F.L. ROUNDUP; Challenge Lures Carroll To Seattle
  • N.H.L. ROUNDUP; Wild Edges Penguins Despite Crosby's Goals
  • NATIONAL BRIEFING | MIDWEST; Ohio: Power Is Restored at Cleveland Airport
  • NATIONAL BRIEFING | SOUTH; Mississippi: Two Accused of Stealing Hurricane Money
  • NATIONAL BRIEFING | WASHINGTON; New Efforts In Fighting Crime On Indian Reservations
  • NATIONAL BRIEFING | WASHINGTON; Suicide Rate Increases Among Younger Veterans
  • THE NEEDIEST CASES; Robbed, Then Scared; Armed, Then Arrested
  • New Film May Sway Brazil's Vote On President
  • New Jersey Vote Backs Marijuana For Severely Ill
  • Ninth Church Vandalized in Malaysia as Tensions Rise
  • NORTH DAKOTA SHUFFLE; Governor Will Run for Senate
  • North Korea Seeks Talks With U.S. On a Treaty
  • Not All Ski Slopes Are Environmentally Equal, Study Concludes
  • NYC; Oh, Right, That Attack Under Bush
  • Obama Weighs Tax on Banks To Cut Deficit
  • OBSERVATORY; From Shells, an Insight Into Neanderthal Minds
  • OBSERVATORY; Neanderthal Decorative Shells Found in Southeastern Spain
  • OBSERVATORY; Tracking Device Reports A Round-Trip Wonder
  • OBSERVATORY; Warmed by the Sun, Asteroid Changes Shape
  • ON THE ROAD; E-Mail? Free. Internet? That'll Cost You.
  • OP-ED COLUMNIST; A Serious Proposal
  • OP-ED COLUMNIST; The Dragon's Swagger
  • OP-ED COLUMNIST; The Tel Aviv Cluster
  • OP-ED CONTRIBUTOR; Al Qaeda's Shadowland
  • OP-ED CONTRIBUTOR; India's Opening With Bangladesh
  • OP-ED CONTRIBUTOR; Russian Advice on Afghanistan
  • Paid Notice: Deaths ANDERSON, DR. MELODY M.
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  • Paid Notice: Deaths CROCKETT, SISTER MARY MANUELLA, O.P.
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  • Paid Notice: Deaths KAUFMAN, ROBERT JAY
  • Paid Notice: Deaths KELLMAN, JOSEPH
  • Paid Notice: Deaths KLEIBACKER, CHARLES JOHN (19212010)
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  • Personal Focus as Same-Sex-Marriage Trial Opens
  • PERSONAL HEALTH; Healthy Aging, With Nary a Supplement
  • POLITICUS; Oil at Heart of Dispute Over Iran
  • President Signals Flexibility on Health Plan Tax
  • PRESIDENTIAL SCHEDULE; Obama to Attend Funeral
  • Q&A; Thinking About Shrinking
  • REALLY?; Milk thistle is good for the liver.
  • RECIPES FOR HEALTH; White Bean Burgers
  • Reds Win Bidding for a Potential Ace From Cuba
  • REUTERS BREAKINGVIEWS; Risks Still High for Junk Bonds
  • RINGS; Langenbrunner Will Be the U.S. Captain
  • RINGS; Vonn Rejects Size Theory
  • RINGS; Vonn Rival Likely Out
  • Ruble Jumps As Russia Reopens Its Markets
  • SECOND OPINION; Facing End-of-Life Talks, Doctors Choose to Wait
  • Selig Says Steroid Era Is Basically Over
  • Shirley Rich, Grand Dame of Casting, Dies at 87
  • SOCCER; Mali Races Back to Tie Angola, 4-4
  • SPORTS BRIEFING | BASEBALL; Rangers And Guerrero Have Deal
  • SPORTS BRIEFING | COLLEGE FOOTBALL; Fired South Florida Coach Fights Back
  • SPORTS BRIEFING | LITTLE LEAGUE; New Division Extends the Game
  • SPORTS BRIEFING | MIXED MARTIAL ARTS; Emirate In Ultimate Fighting Business
  • States Lower Test Standards For Diploma
  • STOCKS AND BONDS; Shares Edge Higher as Investors Await Earnings
  • Supreme Court Blocks Plan for Trial Webcast
  • TELEVISION REVIEW | 'BLUE MOUNTAIN STATE'; A Backup Sees Plenty Of Action Off the Field
  • Terror Suspect's Lawyer Asks for Dismissal of Case
  • Tested by Many Foes, Passion of a Russian Dissident Endures
  • THEATER REVIEW | 'L'EFFET DE SERGE'; Mysterious, Low-Tech, Basement Barnum
  • THEATER REVIEW | 'THE MYOPIA'; See Warren G. Harding and Carol Channing; Blink and Miss World War I
  • THUNDER 106, KNICKS 88; Knicks See What 'Improved' Looks Like
  • TV SPORTS; Giving the Crash Course In Admission and Apology
  • U.N. Adopts Bland Home For Gutting Of Quarters
  • Using a Little Body English To Give Electronic Commands
  • VITAL SIGNS; Awareness: To Measure Medicine, Mind the Spoon
  • VITAL SIGNS; Regimens: Withdrawal Warning on Parkinson's Drugs
  • VITAL SIGNS; Risks: Loss of Bone Mass Linked to Contraceptive
  • W.T.O. to Review U.S. Tariff on Chinese Tires
  • Wealthy Mexicans Killed in Crash
  • WEEK'S NOTABLES
  • WHITE HOUSE MEMO; Blagojevich Apologizes
  • WHITE HOUSE MEMO; Reid's Words On Race Carry Hints Of Obama's
  • White House Opposes Challenge to Senator Gillibrand
  • Wichita Murder Trial Delayed
  • Williams Pleads Guilty In '02 Driver Shooting
  • With New Attacks, Afghan War No Longer Pauses for Winter
  • With New Member, Supreme Court Takes New Look at Crime Lab Ruling
  • With Updated Hubble Telescope, Reaching Farther Back in Time
  • WORLD BRIEFING | AFRICA; Somalia: 18 Die In Rebel Clashes
  • WORLD BRIEFING | EUROPE; China: Interceptor Missile Tested
  • WORLD BRIEFING | EUROPE; Denmark: Terrorism Charge Filed In Attack On Cartoonist
  • WORLD BRIEFING | EUROPE; Georgia: Leaders of a Mutiny Receive Prison Sentences
  • WORLD BRIEFING | MIDDLE EAST; Gaza: Bomb Blast Kills Militant
  • WORLD BRIEFING | THE AMERICAS; Canada: Tiger Mauls Its Owner
  • WORLD BRIEFING | THE AMERICAS; Mexico: Prominent Businessman Dies in Crash of Helicopter
  • A GOOD APPETITE; A Fallen Star of French Cuisine, Restored to Its Silver Platter
  • A Prosecutor Of a 9/11 Case Who Is Likely To Try Another
  • A Right on Plaxico Terrace To Paul Castellano Way
  • A Top Condé Nast Executive Is Leaving
  • ABOUT NEW YORK; Closing Pipeline To Needy, City Shreds Clothes
  • ADVERTISING; Super Bowl Sales as Economic Indicator
  • Airbus Criticizes Latest U.S. Air Force Specs for Refueling Tanker
  • Airbus Warns Uncertainty Over Military Transport Orders Could Threaten Company
  • AN APPRAISAL; Rohmer the Classicist, Calmly Dissecting Desire
  • ANALYSIS; As McGwire Moves on, Public Will, Too
  • Arbitron's Chief Resigns After a False Statement
  • Arts Groups Protest Default On Grants
  • ARTS, BRIEFLY; CBS Comedies Deliver
  • ARTS, BRIEFLY; PBS Sets New Shows
  • ARTS, BRIEFLY; Rather's Appeal Request Rejected By Court
  • ARTS, BRIEFLY; Simon And Garfunkel To Play Jazzfest
  • ARTS, BRIEFLY; Sony Switches 'Spider-Man' Plans
  • ARTS, BRIEFLY; While 'Spider-Man' Musical Offers Refunds
  • As the Clock Runs, Warner Weighs if It's Time to Go
  • Asian Stocks Mixed, Oil Drops
  • AUTO RACING; Spanish Driver Extends Rally Lead
  • Baseball To Monitor Marlins' Spending
  • Black Candidate's Decision Transforms New Orleans Race
  • Blair Aide Unapologetic Over Britain's Role in Prelude to Iraq War
  • BOOKS OF THE TIMES; In the Soviet Union, When Food Was Scarce, Hope Could Still Be Nourished
  • Boy, 4, Chooses Long Locks And Is Suspended From Class
  • BREAKINGVIEWS.COM; The Vagaries Of Bank Bonuses
  • Britain Moves to Ban Islamic Group
  • Cadbury Tries to Fight Off Kraft With Early Taste of Results
  • California Panel Considers Money From Climate Rules
  • Campaign to Focus on Distracted Driving
  • THE CAUCUS; Palin the Analyst
  • China Raises Reserve Requirements for State-Owned Banks
  • China's Central Bank Tightens Liquidity Further
  • China's Missile Test Is Said to Signal Displeasure With U.S.
  • Chinese Maker Hopes to Offer Electric Car for U.S. by Year-End
  • COLLEGE FOOTBALL; A Texas-Style Engagement
  • Colts Look for Balance Of Rested Versus Rusty
  • Committee to Push Votes to Censure or Expel Monserrate
  • Consuela Lee, 83, Pianist and Educator
  • Contractor Jailed in Cuba Was Aiding Religious Groups, U.S. Says
  • Corzine, in Farewell, Admits Failure to Relieve Tax Burden
  • DANCE REVIEW | JEREMY WADE; Hello Creepy: A Spooky Side to Japan's Cute Culture
  • DANCE REVIEW; A Glimpse Of a Modern Pioneer
  • Deals to Restrain Generic Drugs Face a Ban in Health Care Bill
  • DINING BRIEFS | RECENTLY OPENED
  • DIPLOMATIC MEMO; Clinton's Familiar Task: Defusing Tensions in Asia
  • Documents Send Mixed Signal on Airport Scanners
  • Drug Suspect Accused of Boiling Bodies
  • Dutch Carmaker Still Pushing to Buy Saab
  • 'Early Show' Anchor Will Change Roles at CBS
  • ECONOMIC SCENE; A Piece Missing In the Reform
  • EDITORIAL | APPRECIATIONS; Miep Gies
  • EDITORIAL; Compassion in New Jersey
  • EDITORIAL; Football and Antitrust
  • EDITORIAL; Tax Them Both
  • Eight Protesters Die in Afghan Unrest
  • European Central Bank's Tough Balancing Act
  • F.D.I.C. Seeks Comment on Bank Fee Plan
  • Fed Is Again Accused of Blocking Release of A.I.G. Bailout Information
  • Fierce Quake Devastates Haiti; Worst Is Feared
  • FOOD STUFF; A Terra Cotta Dish for Earthy Baking
  • FOOD STUFF; The Grape Once Again Proves Its Versatility
  • FOOD STUFF; The Season for Maine Shrimp Is Extended
  • For All Its Success, Will 'Avatar' Change the Industry?
  • For Bankers, Saying 'Sorry' Has Its Perils
  • For Some, 'Kosher' Equals Pure
  • France Confident It Can Both Tax and Retain Bankers
  • Frantic Hunt for News on Haiti's Quake
  • Frigid Londoners Line Up For Two Blasts of Heat
  • GLOBAL SOCCER; Maradona's Task: Harmony From Chaos
  • Goldman E-Mail Message Lays Bare Trading Conflicts
  • GOOGLE MAY END VENTURE IN CHINA OVER CENSORSHIP
  • Google's Threat Would Mean Giving Up a Lucrative Market
  • GRASSY PIECES OF HISTORY
  • Hey Google, Anybody Home?
  • How a Bronx Glass Installer Became the Web Pirate Who Leaked 'Wolverine'
  • Hundreds of Nigerians March to Protest Ailing Leader's Absence
  • Illinois Tries United Front Against Fish and Lawsuit
  • In Galleon Case, Tipper Is Revealed
  • In New York Restaurants, the Rise of Rome
  • In Reversal, Government Agrees to Protect Jaguar Habitat
  • INTERNATIONAL REAL ESTATE; House Hunting in ... Scotland
  • Interview With Harold Ford Jr.
  • Investors Sell as Japan Airlines Nears a Bankruptcy Filing
  • Iraq Says Raids Thwarted a Wide-Ranging Plot to Attack Targets in Baghdad
  • It's Football in January, Minus the Weather
  • Knox Burger, 87, Agent And Book Editor, Dies
  • Labor Campaigns Against Tax on Health Plans
  • Laughing Through Tears For a Yiddish Theater Star
  • LEADING OFF; Skepticism Follows McGwire's Tears
  • LETTER; Poverty in New York City
  • LETTER; She Hid Anne Frank
  • LETTER; The Saudis' View
  • LETTERS TO THE INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE; Empowering Moderate Muslims
  • LETTERS; A Mere Bag of Shells
  • LETTERS; Eating Isn't Rescuing
  • LETTERS; How to Stop America's Scientific Brain Drain
  • LETTERS; When Religion Oppresses Women
  • Looking Past The Facade Of Italian City After Riots
  • Luxembourg Minister Nears Reappointment as Eurogroup Chief
  • Magazines Lost a Fourth of Ad Pages in '09
  • Management Shake-Up Continues at Disney
  • Manslaughter Defense Remains Open Issue in Doctor's Killing
  • MASSACHUSETTS SENATE RACE; Democrat Goes on Attack
  • McGwire Called Fearful Of Prosecution in 2005
  • Mexico Holds Drug Suspect Accused of Grisly Tactics
  • MILLROSE MAKES A PLEA FOR ATTENTION
  • Mina Bern, Versatile Yiddish Actress, Dies at 98
  • THE MINIMALIST; Tri-Tip: A Steak Worth the Hunt
  • Mixed Signals Complicate European Bank's Task
  • Motorcycle Bomb Kills Iranian Physics Professor
  • MOVIE REVIEW | 'CARMEL'; For Israelis Now, Echoes of Strife Then
  • MUSIC REVIEW | 'STIFFELIO'; A Wife's Betrayal, a Husband's Internal Seething
  • MUSIC REVIEW | CHAMBERFEST; Wistful Baroque Moods Echo Through Time
  • MUSIC REVIEW | FABOLOUS; That Old R&B Tag Team of Love and Lust
  • MUSIC REVIEW; Up-and-Coming Musicians, With a Prominent Backer
  • N.B.A. ROUNDUP; Big Night From Duncan Powers Spurs in Rout of the Lakers
  • N.H.L. ROUNDUP; Goalies Show Top Form as Devils Edge Rangers
  • N.H.L. ROUNDUP; Islanders 6, Red Wings 0
  • NATIONAL BRIEFING | SCIENCE; Web Tool Tracks the Flu
  • NATIONAL BRIEFING | SOUTH; Georgia: Two Killed at Truck Rental Office
  • NATIONAL BRIEFING | SOUTH; North Carolina: Chemical Spill Closes Port
  • NATIONAL BRIEFING | SOUTH; South Carolina: Thurmond Son Ponders Run
  • NATIONAL BRIEFING | WEST; California: Earthquake Damage Climbs
  • THE NEEDIEST CASES; Sidelined From Work, But Always On the Hunt
  • New Twist In Lawsuit Against Billionaire
  • NEWS ANALYSIS; Year of Plots: A 2nd Prism
  • Nintendo Wii to Add Netflix Service for Streaming Video
  • Nobel Winner to Step Down as Chief at Sloan-Kettering
  • Nominee to E.U. Aid Post Gets a Grilling
  • O'Brien Rejects NBC Shift: He's Set to Say Good Night
  • Obama to Propose Bank Tax To Recoup Bailout Losses
  • Officer Offered Clemency for Sex, Woman Testifies
  • Oil Prices Widen Trade Deficit As Exports Grow Marginally
  • On Fourth Down, The Gambles Rise
  • ON THE LONDON STAGE; New Varnish for the Boards: British Theater Undergoing a Renewal
  • OP-ED COLUMNIST; Is China The Next Enron?
  • OP-ED COLUMNIST; The Biggest Loser
  • OP-ED CONTRIBUTOR; Sri Lanka's Choice, and the World's Responsibility
  • OP-ED CONTRIBUTOR; The Holes in America's Anti-Terror Fence
  • Opera's Unlikely Embrace of the Telecast
  • Paid Notice: Deaths ASHUR, GERTRUDE BONDEL
  • Paid Notice: Deaths BOGEN, JOY
  • Paid Notice: Deaths HRUSKA, LAURA CHAPMAN
  • Paid Notice: Deaths LANDAU, MARY A.
  • Paid Notice: Deaths LEEDS, FLORENCE
  • Paid Notice: Deaths MCNAMARA, DANIEL J.
  • Paid Notice: Deaths MEISTER, MARVIN
  • Paid Notice: Deaths PENNOYER, PAUL G.
  • Paid Notice: Deaths RATTNER, NATHANIEL, D.D.S.
  • Paid Notice: Deaths ROSENBLUM, SYLVIA
  • Paid Notice: Deaths SABA MASRI, MOISES
  • Paid Notice: Deaths SCHLESS, EDMEE DE M
  • Paid Notice: Deaths SIMPKINS, FELICIA PEGGI
  • Paid Notice: Deaths SOBEL, ROBERTA STEIN
  • Paid Notice: Memorials KAISER, BARBARA LIEBERMAN MOM
  • Paterson's 15-Year-Old Son Is Questioned but Not Charged After Dice Game, Officials Say
  • Port Shut Down Over Explosives Leak
  • THE POUR; Pinot Noir With an Umlaut
  • Predetermination
  • PROPERTY VALUES; What You Get for ... $500,000
  • Questions for the Big Bankers
  • Ray Solomonoff, 83; Made Machines Think
  • RECIPES FOR HEALTH; Portobello Mushroom Cheeseburgers
  • Report Links Vehicle Exhaust to Health Problems
  • RESTAURANT REVIEW; There Will Be Pigs' Feet
  • RINGS; Vonn Unhurt After A Fall
  • RINGS; Warm Weather Shuts Resort in Vancouver
  • ROUNDUP; Ohio State Hands Purdue 2nd Loss After Hot Start
  • S. Korea and U.S. Dismiss N. Korea's Peace Talks Proposal
  • Sanchez Stockpiles Points In the Confidence Game
  • Saudi and Yemeni Forces Fight Rebels on 2 Fronts
  • Senate Hopeful in New State Airs Evolving Views
  • Shirley Rich, 87, a Star Among Casting Directors
  • The Sky's Never Been the Limit
  • SOCCER; Chicago Out In Cold In World Cup Bid
  • SOCCER; Egypt Starts Well in Its Title Defense
  • Somali Man Is Charged In 2 More Ship Hijackings
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  • SPORTS OF THE TIMES; Baseball Needs More Talking And Less Tears
  • SPORTS OF THE TIMES; Coaches Come and Go, Except JoePa
  • SQUARE FEET; Awaiting the Super Kickoff in Fort Lauderdale
  • SQUARE FEET; Seeking a Way to Pay For Green Makeovers
  • STOCKS AND BONDS; Shares Tumble Amid Concern About a Tax on Banks
  • Study Questions Value Of a Therapy for Injuries
  • Supreme Court Weighs Authority, Not Legality, of Civil Confinements
  • Talks to Begin on Creating a Bipartisan Budget Panel
  • THE TEMPORARY VEGETARIAN
  • TENNIS; Serena Williams Sails Into Quarterfinals of Warm-Up
  • THEATER REVIEW | 'JERK'; A Grisly Tale In the Guise Of Therapy
  • THEATER REVIEW | 'SILVER STARS'; Voices of Gay Irishmen, Set to Song
  • THEATER REVIEW | 'VERSUS -- IN THE JUNGLE OF CITIES'; Going to the Mat With Mind and Body
  • To Curb Loans, China Tells Banks to Increase Reserves
  • TRANSACTIONS; For Sale or Lease
  • U.N. Says Lawyer Hired Own Killers
  • U.S.C. Hires Kiffin As Coach
  • U.S.D.A. Estimate Puts Corn Crop at a Record
  • Union Chief Seeks to Overhaul Teacher Evaluation Process
  • Video Series Co-Founder Goes to Court Over Study
  • VOLLEYBALL; High Jump Champion To Play In Korea
  • Wall St. Pay Is a Focus Of Many in Washington
  • WORLD BRIEFING | ASIA; South Korea: A Call To Resume Talks
  • WORLD BRIEFING | EUROPE; Britain: Islamic Group Is Banned
  • WORLD BRIEFING | EUROPE; Russia: Conditions For Meeting Pope
  • WORLD BRIEFING | THE AMERICAS; Ecuador: Foreign Minister Resigns
  • WORLD BRIEFING | THE AMERICAS; Venezuela: Blackouts Are Scheduled
  • '09 Deadliest Year for Afghans, U.N. Says
  • A Cardinal Redeems Himself in a Big Way
  • A Step in the Right Direction, But Not Everyone Is Cheering
  • A Theater and a Jukebox in a Lightweight Package
  • Administration Loosens Purse Strings for Transit Projects
  • Administration Says Stimulus Has Worked
  • ADVERTISING; A Census Campaign That Speaks in Many Tongues
  • After 4 Trials, Government Ends Its Case Against Gotti
  • After a Hole Emerged, Greene Hit His Stride
  • After a Longtime Rise, Obesity Rates in U.S. Level Off, Data Suggest
  • After a Year of Learning, the First Lady Seeks Out a Legacy
  • Agency Names 6 to Lead New Investigative Units
  • Aide to Leave Mayor's Staff For a Job At His Charity
  • Anxious Haitians in U.S. Search for Information
  • Anxious Moments Before Hearing the Words 'I'm O.K.'
  • App of the Week: Standing Guard Over a Lost Phone
  • Art Rust Jr., 82, Pioneer in Sports Talk Radio
  • ARTS, BRIEFLY; 'Idol' Returns To Winning Ways
  • ARTS, BRIEFLY; Artwork Destroyed As Artist Planned
  • ARTS, BRIEFLY; Comedic Overachiever Adds To Résumé
  • ARTS, BRIEFLY; GLAAD Award Nominees
  • ARTS, BRIEFLY; Ke$ha Ends Susan Boyle's 'Dream'
  • ARTS, BRIEFLY; Vatican Pans 'Avatar'
  • AUTO RACING: Nascar Races Shifted To ESPN
  • BASEBALL: Church Completes Deal With Pirates
  • Baucus on Incentives
  • Beverly Hills Says No to Outside Students
  • Billionaire Aims to Unite 3 Telecom Firms
  • Binghamton President Announces Retirement
  • Bogged Down in the Middle East
  • Boldly Going Where Bose Has Gone Before
  • BOOKS OF THE TIMES; Compelled To Wander, Nowhere To Go
  • BRIDGE; Ending Year On High Note, Then Starting On Another
  • Calorie Law Is No Match For Gluttony Of Holidays
  • China Nearly Doubles Security Budget for Restive Western Area
  • China Puts Lid on Google Defiance
  • The Chinese Disconnection
  • Coach's Departure Leaves Resentment and Uncertainty
  • COLLEGE BASKETBALL ROUNDUP; Surging Pittsburgh Defeats UConn
  • COLLEGE FOOTBALL: Keenum Is Returning To Houston
  • Court Is Told Mayor Aided In Massacre Of Filipinos
  • CRITICAL SHOPPER | LILY ET CIE; Vintage Clothing, Red-Carpet Ready
  • CURRENTS | DEALS; Furnishings, Marked Down
  • CURRENTS | EVENTS; The Dumpster Beautified
  • CURRENTS | OPEN; High Design in D.C.
  • CURRENTS | ROOMS; Don't Forget to Look Out the Windows
  • DANCE REVIEW | RICHARD ALSTON DANCE COMPANY; Leaps and Bounds (and Boundlessness) in Step-Packed Choreography
  • Deadly Protest in Afghanistan Highlights Tensions
  • DEALBOOK COLUMN; Wall St. Ethos Under Scrutiny At a Hearing
  • Deaths at Hands of Militants Rise in Pakistan
  • Decision Promised Soon On Cape Cod Wind Farm
  • Democrats Fight to Hold Crucial Seat: Kennedy's
  • Devastation, Seen From a Ship
  • Direct Approach Works for Avon
  • Doctor's Killer on Trial
  • Donald Goerke, 83, Creator of SpaghettiOs
  • DUBAI JOURNAL; Piercing the Sky Amid a Deflating Economy
  • E.U. Markets Nominee Seeks to Reassure U.K. Finance Sector
  • Ed Beach, Host of 'Just Jazz' Radio Show, Dies at 86
  • EDITORIAL; Discrimination on Trial, but Not on TV
  • EDITORIAL; Google in China
  • EDITORIAL; Haiti
  • EDITORIAL; More Than a Scandal in Belfast
  • Espada May Have Violated Laws, Cuomo's Office Says
  • Europe's Former Antitrust Chief, Seeking Digital Post, Is Not a Shoo-In
  • Expanding Universe, Expanding Storage
  • Few Burns for Four Bankers on the Hot Seat
  • FITNESS; When the Gym Isn't Enough
  • Flawed Building Likely a Big Element
  • Flight Diverted After Threats
  • For Suffolk Day Laborers, Times Get Tougher as Makeshift Homes Are Leveled
  • Forget Wind. Pickens Turns Focus to Gas.
  • FRONT ROW; Designer, Salesman, Mannequin
  • Gillibrand Responds to Ford's Challenge, Calling Him Out of Touch With New York
  • GLOBAL SOCCER; A Question of Pre-Cup Motivation
  • Golden Globes Seek 10% Ratings Rise
  • GOLF: Three Get Ready For Prime Time
  • Google Is Not Alone in Discontent, but Its Threat to Leave Stands Out
  • Google's Threat Echoed Everywhere Except China
  • Growth In Germany Neared Zero At End of '09
  • Guinea's Ruler Surfaces
  • Haiti Lies in Ruins; Grim Search for Untold Dead
  • High Court Seems Skeptical of N.F.L. Antitrust Claim
  • 'I Just Want My Wife's Corpse,' Survivor Pleads
  • 'Idol' Creator Plans to Start New Business
  • In Google's Rebuke of China, Focus Falls on Cybersecurity
  • In Miami's Little Haiti, Lack of Word From Relatives Back Home Fuels Concern
  • In New York, Tormented By Silence From Haiti
  • In Quake Aftermath, U.S. Suspends Deportations to Haiti
  • Introduced by the Red Bulls, Backe Says He's Ready to Rebuild
  • Islamists Press Jordan to Stop Aiding U.S. Forces in Afghanistan
  • Israel and Turkey Patch Up Latest Rift, Over a Diplomatic Slight
  • Japan Airlines to Get New Chief
  • Judge Finds 'Intentional Discrimination' Against Blacks in Fire Department Hiring
  • Justice Dept. Opens Front Against Bias In Lending
  • KEEPING HIS EYE ON THE BALL
  • KNICKS 93, 76ERS 92; After a Critical Basket, Lee Makes a Sad Trip
  • Kroes's Toughest Case May Be Confirmation
  • Lawmakers Offer Ethics Plan, but Paterson Says It Falls Short
  • LEADING OFF; The Kiffin Chronicles
  • LETTER FROM AMERICA; Intelligence Has Its Limitations
  • LETTER; Fewer Tourists in New York? The Vendors Knew
  • LETTER; Google Stands Up to China
  • LETTER; Lawyers for Partial Hire
  • LETTER; Making Bankers Give Back
  • LETTER; The Fate of Conan and Jay
  • LETTERS; Reaching Out to a Devastated Haiti
  • LIFE AS A RUNWAY; A Head for Experimentation
  • Like a College Visit, Minus Kegs
  • MAKING AN APPEAL; Leahy Leads a Repeal Effort
  • Man Dies Trying to Repair An Elevator in Manhattan
  • Manhattan Church Is Now a Landmark, but No Longer a Refuge for the Homeless
  • Meet Mikey, 8: U.S. Has Him On Watch List
  • Mite in the Middle
  • Mortgage Assets Take Toll on Société Générale

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